Pulsate

LONDON, UK, 2013

Pulsate, a pop-up installation in Primrose Hill designed by Lily Jencks and Nathanael Dorent is a tile showroom in London that almost looks like a psychedelic cartoon. Porcelain tiles in four different monochrome shades are placed across the meandering surface inside the Capitol Designer Studio, a small tile showroom. The tiles are laid out in a zigzagging pattern that warps around a precisely sculpted space incorporating sloped floors, ceiling walls and benches.

  • AWARDS
  • Short listed with three others for the World Interior News Awards for the most innovative retail award under 200m2. Ceremony Nov 2013
  • KEY FEATURES
  • - Tolerances to geometry and fabrication to house tiles
  • - Heavy timber construction to be installed in in Victorian property
  • Client | Capitol Design Studio (CDS) tiles; Mark William
  • Location | Primrose Hill, London
  • Architect | Lily Jencks
    Nathaneal Dorent
  • Staff Lead | Manja van de Worp
  • Type | Tile Shop Interior

People can sit and have a discussion, lie on the slope, or view the merge of the pattern of the tiles and the fluid geometry of the space.

The concepts behind the installation, Lily says, is being “One is about perception – how you perceive distances and shapes; and make sense of space. The other is about how to display an object that’s for sale; we wanted the space to be more than just a showroom selling tiles; to rethink the commercial transaction as something more creative.”

The floor is sloped, and benches are built into the structure, so you’re never really sure what you’re looking at.

STRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT, GEOMETRY & FABRICATION
The timber structure to which the tiles are clad is installed with great precision to be able to generate the continuous flow in pattern and therefore space. Due to this tightly integrated system of pattern and structure there was no margin for error. If the design was altered by even a fraction, the pattern would lose its effect entirely. This installation is made in an existing Victorian house in Primrose Hill, Camden, London.

The concepts behind the installation, Lily says, is being “One is about perception – how you perceive distances and shapes; and make sense of space. The other is about how to display an object that’s for sale; we wanted the space to be more than just a showroom selling tiles; to rethink the commercial transaction as something more creative.”